Experts & Staff


Mark Leonard

Director

Languages: English, French, German
Areas of Expertise: Geo-politics and Geo-economics, China, EU-Russia relations, transatlantic relations, EU institutions, Public diplomacy and nation branding, UK foreign policy

Mark Leonard is co-founder and director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, the first pan-European think tank.

He writes a syndicated column on global affairs for Project Syndicate.

He was Chairman of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Geoeconomics until 2016.

Previously he worked as director of foreign policy at the Centre for European Reform and as director of the Foreign Policy Centre, a think tank he founded at the age of 24 under the patronage of former British Prime Minister Tony Blair. In the 1990s Mark worked for the think tank Demos where his Britain™ report was credited with launching Cool Britannia. Mark has spent time in Washington, D.C. as a Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States, and in Beijing as a visiting scholar at the Chinese Academy for Social Sciences.

Honoured as a “Young Global Leader” of the World Economic Forum, he spends a lot of time helping governments, companies, and international organisations make sense of the big geo-political trends of the twenty-first century. He is a regular speaker and prolific writer and commentator on global issues, the future of Europe, China's internal politics, and the practice of diplomacy and business in a networked world. His essays have  appeared in publications such as Foreign Affairs, The Financial TimesThe New York TimesLe MondeSüddeutsche ZeitungEl PaisGazeta WyborczaForeign Policy, the New StatesmanThe Daily TelegraphThe EconomistTime, and Newsweek.

As well as writing and commenting frequently in the media on global affairs, Mark is author of two best-selling books. His first book, Why Europe will run the 21st Century, was published in 2005 and translated into 19 languages. Mark’s second book, What does China think? was published in 2008 and translated into 15 languages. He has published an edited volume on Connectivity Wars and is working on a future book on the same topic. 


Latest from Mark Leonard

  • U.S.-German relationship on the rocks (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 29 October 2012

    A fundamental shift in interests and outlook is leaving the United States and Germany with potentially irreconcilable differences. This widening divide between Berlin and Washington may threaten the entire Western alliance.

     


    China’s technology revolution (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 02 October 2012

    China's politics is being transformed by the internet. But while individual officials live in a state of 'internet terror', the arrival of managed social media could paradoxically help the communist party to stay in power.

     


    The great Sino-American divorce (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 24 August 2012

    Since the global financial crisis in 2008, we have been living through the slow and painful end of 'Chimerica'. Now the terms of the separation between the two nations risk awkward discomfort for the rest of the world.

     


    China’s affluence crisis (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 04 August 2012

    For most of the last 30 years China’s leaders have been kept awake at night worrying about their country’s poverty. But as the country approaches its once-in-a decade leadership transition this fall, it is China’s affluence, rather than its poverty, that is causing sleepless nights.

     


    The end of the affair? (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 25 July 2012

    Four years after Barack Obama's landmark speech in front of a crowd of 200,000 in Berlin, the transatlantic alliance is fading fast. What went wrong?

     


    Merkel is our only hope (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 09 July 2012

    The British debate on Germany and the euro should focus on understanding Merkel's technocratic ideas without invoking Hitler and the Second World War. The best way to get Germany to abandon its counterproductive economic reforms is to talk about a compelling European future, rather than dwelling on the past.

     


    Terminating the European status quo (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 06 July 2012

    It is becoming clear that the roots of the euro crisis are political rather than economic. The 2008 financial meltdown may well give birth to one of the great moments of political realignment where mainstream parties are being pushed to the sidelines and parties that used to skulk on the fringes are dominating the agenda.

     


    Europe will leave G20 with a unilateral future (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 21 June 2012

    Europeans are strongly in favor of global governance when it is a process they inflict on others, but they are not so keen when others comment on Europe’s affairs. So, is Europe losing its religion on multilateralism?

     


Contact

Email: mark.leonard@ecfr.eu
Tel: +44 (0)20 7227 6869

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