Experts & Staff


Mark Leonard

Director

Languages: English, French, German
Areas of Expertise: Geo-politics and Geo-economics, China, EU-Russia relations, transatlantic relations, EU institutions, Public diplomacy and nation branding, UK foreign policy

Mark Leonard is co-founder and director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, the first pan-European think tank.

He writes a syndicated column on global affairs for Project Syndicate.

He was Chairman of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Geoeconomics until 2016.

Previously he worked as director of foreign policy at the Centre for European Reform and as director of the Foreign Policy Centre, a think tank he founded at the age of 24 under the patronage of former British Prime Minister Tony Blair. In the 1990s Mark worked for the think tank Demos where his Britain™ report was credited with launching Cool Britannia. Mark has spent time in Washington, D.C. as a Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States, and in Beijing as a visiting scholar at the Chinese Academy for Social Sciences.

Honoured as a “Young Global Leader” of the World Economic Forum, he spends a lot of time helping governments, companies, and international organisations make sense of the big geo-political trends of the twenty-first century. He is a regular speaker and prolific writer and commentator on global issues, the future of Europe, China's internal politics, and the practice of diplomacy and business in a networked world. His essays have  appeared in publications such as Foreign Affairs, The Financial TimesThe New York TimesLe MondeSüddeutsche ZeitungEl PaisGazeta WyborczaForeign Policy, the New StatesmanThe Daily TelegraphThe EconomistTime, and Newsweek.

As well as writing and commenting frequently in the media on global affairs, Mark is author of two best-selling books. His first book, Why Europe will run the 21st Century, was published in 2005 and translated into 19 languages. Mark’s second book, What does China think? was published in 2008 and translated into 15 languages. He has published an edited volume on Connectivity Wars and is working on a future book on the same topic. 


Latest from Mark Leonard

  • Present at the Destruction (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 01 October 2018

    At the UN General Assembly last week, it was clear to most that the post-war multilateral system is now an artifact of a bygone era. The new world order that is currently emerging will be defined less by shared principles, and more by the whims of individual leaders and governments

    Europe for itself (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 24 July 2018

    As US President Donald Trump continues to wage war on the American-led international order, Europeans can no longer assume that their interests are synonymous with those of the US. The time has come for the European Union to redefine its interests, and to develop a new strategy for defending them.

    Macron Takes Aim at European Politics (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 10 April 2018

    During his first year in office, French President Emmanuel Macron outlined a series of proposals for reforming European institutions; now he is launching a campaign to shake up the European Parliament election in 2019. Through it all, he has adhered to a coherent philosophy of how politics in the twenty-first century should work.

    A New Beginning for European Defence (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard & Norbert Röttgen - 14 February 2018

    It is time to move past institutional integration and develop practical European security capabilities.

    Berlin’s European agenda (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 22 January 2018

    The next German government must lead the way in forging European consensus on migration, foreign policy, and a common system of values. This means it will have to think bigger than ever before.

    Europe's crisis starts at home (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 05 December 2017

    The biggest threat to the European project is not the "illiberal" saboteurs on the periphery of the EU, but the deep divide within member states, including bastions of liberalism such as France and Germany.

    How Britain Lost Its Cool (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 05 October 2017

    In the past 20 years, the UK and Germany have switched positions, with the latter now representing openness while the former has come to embody backward-looking nationalism. But there is no reason to believe that the two countries won't swap places again.

    Germany’s New Power of the Purse (Commentary)

    Mark Leonard - 02 August 2017

    Berlin's firmer line on Turkey confirms Germany's status as a major economic power.

Contact

Email: mark.leonard@ecfr.eu
Tel: +44 (0)20 7227 6869

Mark Leonard on Twitter