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Germany votes: what does Spain think?

In the last of an ECFR blog series looking at how the German elections are being seen around Europe, we turn to Spain. 

Back in 2012, Rajoy's conservative government felt that it was often let down and cornered by Germany. Tensions flared in the first semester of 2012, as Spain’s risk premium exploded and the country was placed on the verge of full intervention by the Troika due to its collapsing savings bank sector. Fearing that the comfortable absolute majority which the conservatives had taken 8 years to build would be wiped away in just one semester, the dominant feeling about Germany was bitterness and criticism over what Spanish elites perceived as sheer intransigence. As Spain missed deficit targets one after another, and social tensions exploded due to austerity induced cuts in health, education, pensions, and labour markets, Rajoy went against his conservative instincts

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Germany votes: what does Britain think?

In the fourth of this series on how Europe sees the German elections, we examine how Britain feels about the vote.

Britain has become comfortable with Mrs Merkel as Europe’s foremost politician. Her sensible demeanour stands her in good stead with a public with an inbuilt suspicion of anybody seen (or supposed) to be peddling greater ambitions for the European Union (as David Cameron’s criticism of José Manuel Barroso bears out). With polls suggesting that she is similarly well thought of among Germany’s voters, most Britons are assuming that things will continue much as they are now once the elections are out the way – notwithstanding residual curiosity over the intricacies of coalition forming, especially after their own recent experience of it.

If Mrs Merkel, thanks to coalition arithmetic, were to be thrown out, Britain might not be quite so sanguine. There’s a real

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Germany votes: what does Bulgaria think?

In the fourth of this series viewing the German elections from elsewhere in Europe, we ask what the Bulgarians think about the vote. 

Germany’s elections are largely a non-issue in Bulgaria, where political life is consumed by a three-month long mass protest demanding the Socialist-led cabinet’s resignation. Germany is also absent on the main foreign policy issue that preoccupies Bulgarians: the war in Syria, which affects Bulgaria thanks to refugees crossing from Turkey. Politicians and pundits alike break spears unpicking the policies of Russia, UK, US, and France, but German foreign policy passivity keeps the country off the radar screen. That’s surprising, as Bulgaria has often taken clues on European matters after looking closely at Berlin. What is more, the centre-right government of Boyko Borissov, in power until March this year, courted Angela Merkel, extolling the virtues

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Germany votes: what does Italy think?

In the third blog post in this series, we ask what Italians think about the German election. 

As elsewhere, Italians are waiting for Germany to vote with a keen sense of anticipation. But they are not waiting so much for the results and the unveiling of a victorious coalition of whatever make up, as they are waiting for the dictates of the election campaign to end and Berlin to apply itself to key European issues. September 22nd is seen as an excuse for Germany’s politicians to avoid discussing or acting on difficult issues.

Italy’s current government is investing a lot of time and energy in its European links, and on several occasions has called for moves towards banking, fiscal, economic, and political union. Germany is acknowledged as the key partner in these matters – both to show accountability for the tough economic and financial commitments that have been made, and because

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Germany votes: what does France think?

This is the second in a series of blog posts on how the German elections are being seen elsewhere in the EU. 

Having essentially given up hope of a major political shift in Germany, the French are watching their big neighbour's federal elections with remarkable equanimity. The complex electoral arithmetic that might lead to a surprise eviction of Chancellor Angela Merkel from the chancellery is understood only by a tiny minority of observers. Most policy actors and citizens expect Merkel to continue to be the German leader France will have to deal with.

This prospect is now more palatable than it would have been a few months ago. The increased flexibility the European Commission, with the support of Berlin, has shown of late on the application of austerity, the resumption of growth in the eurozone (however tenuous), and the fact that Angela Merkel does not dismiss the principle

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The turmoil in the current system represents an opportunity for Europeans to shape a new order that meets their strategic needs.