European Council on Foreign Relations

Wider horizons for Poland’s foreign policy

A couple of days ago Donald Tusk, the prime minister of Poland, was in London. It was a superb opportunity for journalists to question him about where his country is heading as general elections draw near .You can read an interesting report of a session that he had at The Economist HQ here: As you might expect it gives a healthy dose of level-headed analysis on relations with Russia - ECFR’s Scorecard 2010, published a week or two agao, has noted the rapprochement between Poland and Germany post-2007 has conditioned much more pragmatic ties with Moscow. Even if atmospherics between the two governments are not as positive in the wake of the Smolensk crash a year ago, the turn is still visible. Tusk was also upbeat on Belarus and Ukraine, though in all fairness it’s hard to see the EU agenda getting much mileage in either country.

What’s really interesting is Poland’s effort to

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