European Council on Foreign Relations

ECFR This Week: 24th February 2012

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This week saw the publication of a paper that seeks to explain the tough German negotiating position over the euro crisis. ‘The long shadow of ordoliberalism: Germany’s approach to the euro crisis’, by Sebastian Dullien and Ulrike Guérot, argues that Mrs Merkel’s tough line is not about punishing economic wrongdoing. They argue that it is based upon a consistent approach to economics with broad support within Germany, and that this is unlikely to change under pressure from those anxious about austerity. Click here for a summary of the paper, and click here for the PDF.

Although ECFR’s policy staff spent the week in a policy retreat, discussing the big issues facing Europe (here’s a group photo of most of us looking slightly tired), we published a few other bits and pieces over the last week:

That’s it for now. If you’re interested in the Middle East and North Africa, remember that our MENA programme puts out a weekly email round up of the best analysis that they’ve been reading. We’re also on Twitter (our Madrid, Paris, Rome and Warsaw offices and quite a few of our staff have their own accounts) and on Facebook.

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